Practice Assignment: Product Page Live Review

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As a Wealthy Web Writer member, you have an opportunity to hone your writing skills with Practice Assignments.

For each Practice Assignment, Managing Editor Heather Robson picks a topic, makes up a fictitious client, and provides a brief similar to what a real client will provide. Based on that, you write your Practice Assignment and, if you want, submit it for a live review.

Heather then randomly chooses as many as she can get through in an hour and features them in a live webinar.

The featured assignment here was to write a product page for the client, Scrapbooker’s Haven. Continue reading for a synopsis of the live review, or listen to the webinar          .

The Brief

The assignment was to write a product page that would inspire the visitor to click the Add to Cart button. Here’s a copy of the brief.

Product Page Basics

Since e-commerce companies usually include a page for every item they sell, product pages provide a tremendous opportunity for writers. (Think Amazon, for example.)

Before reviewing submissions, Heather outlined important product page basics to keep in mind.

To write a strong product page, you must:

  1. Know your audience.

  2. Identify the product’s benefits. To find the benefits, look at each feature and ask yourself why it matters, or “so what?” Keep asking that question until you find a benefit that resonates emotionally with your audience. Then zero in on the benefits that will matter the most to your audience.

  3. Touch an emotion when you can… it will make your copy more effective.

  4. Use the language of your audience, which you’ll find when you study reviews of your product or its competitors.

  5. Make it scannable so the reader can easily pick out the key points.

  6. Keep SEO in mind. This can be tricky, Heather warned, because you may be selling a product that’s available in other places. Focus on the best keywords for the product, and then create copy that’s “punchier and more compelling” than the competitors’.

  7. Use good images. Images are essential, Heather told us, so “put on your consultant’s hat.” Although as the writer you likely won’t be sourcing images, think about where to place them on the page, understand how the site generally uses images, and after the page is published, provide feedback to the client on image quality or problems.

As an example of an effective product page, Heather walked us through a page for a weighted blanket from Quility on Amazon.com.

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Susanna Perkins

Susanna was dragged back, kicking and screaming, into freelancing after losing her job in the banking meltdown in March, '09. One 3-month stint in an appalling temp job persuaded her to get serious about establishing herself as web writer. In March, 2012, she moved to a small town in Panama with her husband and three small dogs. After enjoying the writer's life in the culture of "buenas" and "mañana" for 2-1/2 years, she's returned to the US. At least for now.

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