Reality Blog: Fast-Writing Your Way Through Writer’s Block

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Last year, Heather Robson wrote an article on fast writing… writing distraction-free for 15 minutes.

If you haven’t read it, you really should. Fast writing is a great way to generate ideas when you’re struggling for inspiration.

Why am I telling you about this?

Well, this pandemic has thrown my thinking off-course. Normally, I can lay down 800+ words pretty quickly. The first draft might be a bit rough, but at least I have a solid foundation to build on.

Lately though, my mind’s a blank page. And from what I’ve observed, I’d say a lot of writers seem to be having similar struggles right now.

It’s time to kick-start our brains with a good dose of fast writing…

An Idea-Generator

What is fast writing? What’s the technique?

It’s simple.

Set a timer for 15 minutes. Then write! Write whatever comes into your head. Don’t edit, don’t spell-check, don’t correct poor grammar.

Just write.

And you know what? It works!

You can apply it to any type of writing. What I love most about fast writing is the ideas it generates.

For some reason, fast writing changes how I write. Something strange happens… I wander off-topic, big-time whenever I use fast writing. But near the end, I try to plait my ideas back into one common thread.

This is actually a good thing. It helps me generate new ideas and fresh ways of looking at things.

Now every article should have one Big Idea. If you try to mix messages, the result is exactly that… mixed messages.

The reader will be confused, because your message is unclear.

So when I finish a fast write, I take a step back, look at what I wrote, and ask a few questions:

  1. What’s the message I’m trying to convey?
  2. What’s the Big Idea?
  3. Did I start with one Big Idea, then add a second one partway through?
  4. If so, what are these two (or more) Big Ideas?
  5. Will these Big Ideas standalone… are they strong enough to build separate articles on?

Points one and two are the crux of the article. They’re the foundation. If they’re not clear then the entire article will be weak.

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Andrew Murray

Andrew Murray

Andrew has traded the daily grind for a life on the road. He loves the lure of Australia’s wide-open spaces, solitude and isolation. Andrew and his wife Peta are experienced remote travelers, living the simple life on the road. They travel, work and live in their 4x4 truck camper. Andrew plans to build his Money-Making Website Top Wire Traveller to the point where it provides a regular income... enough to sustain their lifestyle on the road.

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